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The Astronomy thread

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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby hansolobiker » Fri Mar 24, 2017 05:06 pm

As they say in France-'Pain au Nain'!-Dwarf Bread!
....And forgiveness walks at my side!
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Grace Speaker » Tue Apr 25, 2017 10:21 am

Nonny Mouse wrote:Pan looks like dwarf bread.
hansolobiker wrote:As they say in France-'Pain au Nain'!-Dwarf Bread!
:lol: Love the idea of some Pan-galactic Dwarf Bread! Specially baked for Great A-Tuin to hurl at any cheeky asteroids who get too close to the Elephants :wink:
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Grace Speaker » Tue Apr 25, 2017 10:33 am

Peggy Witson has just broken the record for the NASA astronaut who has spent the longest amount of time in space - by the time she gets back, she'll have accumulated 2 years in space :shock: :D
Congratulations Peggy! Can you adopt me please? :wink:

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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Grace Speaker » Thu May 25, 2017 09:28 pm

:shock: :D WOW! :D :shock:

The Juno mission has just returned amazing images of Jupiter's south pole, taken from an altitude of just 50,000 - over 7 times closer than the moon is to the Earth. The cyclones are 1,000+km across

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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby chrisboote » Fri May 26, 2017 01:51 pm

Grace Speaker wrote: over 7 times closer than the moon is to the Earth


<Rant>
Grrrrrr! That rubbish, incomprehensible phrase really bugs me
What does it even mean?
If it's one seventh of the distance of the Earth to the Moon, say so

'Closer' is a privative - an absence of something (in this case, distance)

It's like saying 1C is 'seven times colder' than 7C

</Rant>
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Sandra » Fri May 26, 2017 03:33 pm

I do agree, it's a lazy way of talking that appears to becoming part of English usage.

I have fond memories of Richard Artley pulling me up on my use of 'decimate' - thankfully I was able to answer: in best cases yes, in the worst the inverse - a bit of a cross eyed way of saying decrease of 10-90% but we did understand each other
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Grace Speaker » Fri May 26, 2017 03:55 pm

chrisboote wrote:
Grace Speaker wrote: over 7 times closer than the moon is to the Earth


<Rant>
Grrrrrr! That rubbish, incomprehensible phrase really bugs me
What does it even mean?
If it's one seventh of the distance of the Earth to the Moon, say so

'Closer' is a privative - an absence of something (in this case, distance)

It's like saying 1C is 'seven times colder' than 7C

</Rant>
My dear Mr Boote, I fear the heat has made you a bit testy this afternoon. May I suggest a cold glass of something medicinal? :D
I used the relative example of the distance of the moon, rather than actual km, as I have found that people's eyes glaze over when I start banging on about astronomical distances in miles and km (big old nerd that I am) as the numbers are so big they tend to loose their meaning for most people - but a familiar big ball of shinning rock they can relate to. I should know better than to try that on the Forum - my apologies :wink:

Our moon has a slightly elliptical orbit, but is on average approx. 384,000km away from the Earth, while the Juno probe approached Jupiter at just 50,000km - for comparison Jupiter's innermost moon, Metis, is approx. 128,000km away. Jupiter itself is 588,000,000km from Earth. To give an indication of scale, Jupiter is 1,300 times the volume of Earth and is 11 times the diameter, at 142,800kn across to Earth's 12,742km.

Image

Scale comparison of Jupiter and the Earth
Image

The images being returned from the Juno probe are just stunningly beautiful - please take a look https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/a-whole-new-jupiter-first-science-results-from-nasa-s-juno-mission
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby chrisboote » Fri May 26, 2017 07:04 pm

The photos are indeed gorgeous (I was ,looking at them last night)

And I guessed you meant that it flew closer to Jupiter than 1/7 the distance between the Earth and Moon

But the fact remains, you can't have something "X times <less in some way> than" something else

You could have such a comparative if you had three items - e.g. A is 7 times cheaper than B is compared to X, if the prices are A=10, B=70, X=80, but 'cheaper' itself is both a privative AND a comparitor, so is meaningless when used like you did above

So there

Yah boo sucks with knobs on :P
Last edited by chrisboote on Fri May 26, 2017 07:53 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Grace Speaker » Fri May 26, 2017 07:28 pm

chrisboote wrote:So there

Yah boo sucks with knobs on :P
:lol:
Yes Sir, sorry Sir, shan't do it again Sir!
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby chrisboote » Fri May 26, 2017 07:53 pm

:lol: :lol: :lol:
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Grace Speaker » Sun May 28, 2017 04:08 pm

This extraordinary piece of geography is the Hebes Chasma Mesa* on Mars (the photo is from the ESA website) and the first thing I thought of when I saw it was Frank Herbert's Dune . . .

. . . you can take the book away from the girl, but the stories in the mind stay with you forever :D

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*A mesa is flat topped hill with steep sides.
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Auston Trusty » Tue Aug 01, 2017 01:25 pm

Wow, it's magnificent! Man, the universe is full of beautiful planets. Btw, the word Hebes comes from Hebe. She was the goddess of youth.
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby steeljam » Wed Aug 02, 2017 02:50 pm

chrisboote wrote:
Grace Speaker wrote: over 7 times closer than the moon is to the Earth

<Rant>
Grrrrrr! That rubbish, incomprehensible phrase really bugs me
What does it even mean?
If it's one seventh of the distance of the Earth to the Moon, say so
'Closer' is a privative - an absence of something (in this case, distance)
It's like saying 1C is 'seven times colder' than 7C
</Rant>
I feel the same about "This is the first time it has happened since ..." :evil:
No! It is not the first time it has happened.
They should say "This has not happened since ..." or "in X years"
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Grace Speaker » Sat Aug 12, 2017 08:45 pm

The Perseid Meteor shower will be at it's peak tonight :D as the Earth passes through the debris train of the Swift-Tuttle comet

For those in the UK, the best viewing time will be between 11pm tonight and 4am tomorrow morning. Don't worry if you have no idea where the constellation of Perseus is, just put on a warm coat, grab a cup of tea and wander out in to the garden for an Oggle at the stars. Point your chair either West or East (which ever direction is away from the most light pollution) to give yourself more chance of seeing a longer 'streak' of a shooting star . . . unless your neighbour's night-time activities are more interesting, of course :wink: If they call the police, you can always use the excuse of "just doing a bit of meter spotting, officer" :lol:
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Re: The Astronomy thread

Postby Gaspode » Sat Aug 12, 2017 08:57 pm

Grace Speaker wrote:The Perseid Meteor shower will be at it's peak tonight :D as the Earth passes through the debris train of the Swift-Tuttle comet

For those in the UK, the best viewing time will be between 11pm tonight and 4am tomorrow morning. Don't worry if you have no idea where the constellation of Perseus is, just put on a warm coat, grab a cup of tea and wander out in to the garden for an Oggle at the stars. Point your chair either West or East (which ever direction is away from the most light pollution) to give yourself more chance of seeing a longer 'streak' of a shooting star . . . unless your neighbour's night-time activities are more interesting, of course :wink: If they call the police, you can always use the excuse of "just doing a bit of meter spotting, officer" :lol:



We may wander down to the beach later, last time we saw quite a few trails.
And as its quite mild won't need that coat.
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